Entertainment

Comedian Merrick Watts reveals battle with anxiety and depression during SAS Australia

Comedian Merrick Watts reveals battle with anxiety and depression during SAS Australia

Funny man Merrick Watts reveals his mental health battle during tomorrow night’s episode of SAS Australia.

The comedian and former radio personality has quickly become a fan favourite as he endures the various physical and mental challenges thrown at him on the Seven show.

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But the 46-year-old is now addressing the challenges he faces off camera, opening up about his battle with depression after leaving his life on radio.

“For 20 years I worked in radio and I was phenomenally successful,” Watts said.

Watts found success hosting a newly launched breakfast show with Nova 96.9 in the early 2000s, before departing in 2009 to appear in a string of radio shows on Triple M and 2Day FM that were ultimately cancelled due to poor ratings.

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“I had a number one radio program, getting massive ratings, earning a lot of money and it was a really good time,” he can be heard saying during a piece to camera in tomorrow’s episode. “And then it ended.

“You do something like radio for 20 years non-stop, you get used to a certain way of doing things, and then when you are out of it for a little while it’s exciting and it’s kind of cool and a release.

“But then all of a sudden there was a period where I just didn’t have a lot of work.”

Watt’s said the bout of unemployment destroyed his self-confidence and planted the seed for his anxiety and depression.

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“One thing becomes another becomes another, if you let it grow too big it’s too hard to chop down,” he said.

Ahead of his interrogation from the Directing Staff of SAS Australia, Watts addresses his fear of “breaking down” during a voice over.

“That is my greatest fear, not being able to get to the very end (of the course),” he said.

“Because I’m broken, I would just be absolutely gutted because I need this.”