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Vote count continues in Queensland election crippled by tech issues

Vote count continues in Queensland election crippled by tech issues
Votes continue to be counted to determine who will run Queensland's councils and take a seat in state parliament.
Queensland's Electoral Commission says the official count process can take up to two weeks, with about 570,000 people voting by mail because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Labor's challenger for Brisbane's lord mayor, Patrick Condren, conceded defeat yesterday afternoon, returning incumbent Adrian Schrinner to the position.
Adrian Schrinner has been returned as Brisbane's Lord Mayor. (Nine)
Mr Condren said on social media he had spoken with Mr Schrinner, congratulating him on winning the election.
On election night Mr Schrinner claimed victory live on-air with 9News Queensland reporter Ebony Cavallaro.
He said based on information he had received from the scrutineers it was clear he would retain City Hall.
Gold Coast incumbent Tom Tate also looks set to retain his position, while Teresa Harding looks set to win Ipswich - becoming the first female mayor for the region.
Darren Power looks likely to become Logan's next mayor.
In the state by-elections, Labor's Lance McCallum looks like he will win Bundamba while Laura Gerber is on track to hold Currumbin for the Liberal National Party.
The level of turnout in the 77 local government polls and by-elections in the state seats of Currumbin and Bundamba remains unclear.
Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk said yesterday she would order a review into technical issues that hampered the start of the counting process in Saturday's election.
Ms Palaszczuk said she is "pretty disappointed" as the commission's "one job" is to make sure they can run an election.
Mr Schrinner said he would back a review.
"I think that is the sensible thing to do," Cr Schrinner said.
"We saw this after the last council election as well and there was a review at that time."
The commission said a technical issue with the data feed from polling booths delayed the publication of the preliminary results after the close of polling on election day.
"This did not affect the count process itself or the recording of results from over 1000 polling booths around the state," the Electoral Commission of Queensland said in a statement.
- reported with AAP