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Widow's call for inquest after husband dies from bee sting

Widow's call for inquest after husband dies from bee sting
The widow of a man who died after being stung by a bee is calling for an inquest to ensure similar tragedies are not repeated.
Glenn Morton, 34, died after suffering a severe allergic reaction when he was stung on a mine site, north of Perth last year.
His family's grief is compounded by a coroner's report which sheds little light on the details of the emergency response that day.
After Mr Morton was stung, he used his own epipen and called for help.
Mine staff found him unconscious and gave him a second epipen and started CPR.
But his widow Carly Morton said the one page coroner's report doesn't explain why it took several hours for him to be airlifted from Moora to a major hospital in Perth.
"We were just really shocked that there wasn't more to it," she said.
"My concern is that there was a significant delay."
Ms Morton was told by doctors that her husband could have been without oxygen for up to 40 minutes.
"The bee sting was on his ear so the swelling all around his airways and his face would've been limiting his ability to breathe," she said.
Mr Morton was given an epipen when he suffered his first allergic reaction but he was never referred to an allergy specialist.
"Glenn could have had immunotherapy for bee sting and that reduces his sensitivity to bee sting. It's a successful treatment but his family didn't even know that treatment was available," Maria Said, Allergy & Anaphylaxis Australia CEO told 9News.
Hospital admissions for anaphylaxis have increased five-fold in the last two decades, while the number of deaths have increased by 42 percent over six years.
Peak medical and patient allergy groups are asking for a $20 million commitment from major political parties to fund a national strategy that would improve access to care, training and reporting.
Both major parties have been silent on their request.
"We can't be the health disease that is the poor cousin that receives the scraps of what's left," said Maria Said.
Ms Morton is pushing for more awareness and an inquest to identify any gaps in procedures.
"My concern is that there were inadequate procedures in place and inadequate understanding on how to respond to Glenn's condition," she said.
After learning of Ms Morton's concerns, Iluka Resources which runs the Cataby mine site where Glenn worked as a subcontractor, reached out to the family.
"We've provided some information to the family and we've also provided contact details of a member of Iluka's executive team for futher direct contact," a spokesman said in a written statement.
"Glenn's passing was indeed a tragedy. Iluka' first priority is always the safety and wellbeing of our people, including contractors and sub-contractors. The company has participated fully and openly with the investigations of the state government's regulator."
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