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US residents using shredded t-shirts as toilet paper block pipes

US residents using shredded t-shirts as toilet paper block pipes
A US council has been forced to warn residents to flush only human waste and toilet paper after a sewer was blocked because people had resorted to using shredded t-shirts.
City of Redding in Northern California was forced to remind residents that if they were using anything other than toilet paper to clean up, it cannot be flushed into the sewer system.
"COR Wastewater Management responded to a sewer backup from shredded t-shirts being used in place of toilet paper," the council tweeted.
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A demonstration showed how toilet paper breaks up while wet wipes do not. (City Of Redding)
"Remember, if you use anything other than toilet paper, bag it. Don't flush it."
The local government then shared a video comparing how toilet paper breaks down in water compared to a standard wet wipe.
When swirled, toilet paper breaks up into smaller pieces while the wipe maintains its integrity, often attracting water contaminants such as kitchen grease and fat.
The warning issued to residents. (City Of Redding)
"Toilets aren't trash cans," the local government warns.
"Think before you flush. Avoid clogging your sewers and never put wipes in your toilet."
The US has been afflicted with the same panic-buying hysteria as Australia, with toilet paper shortages being reported across the country.
A British official says a giant "fatberg" – a mass of hardened fat, oil and baby wipes measuring 64 metres long – has been found blocking a sewer in southwestern England. (AP)
In London, a craze of flushing wet wipes recently created the world's biggest "fatberg", a term coined by local sewer managers to describe a ball of hardened wipes and fat.
In October 2019 council workers cleared a 40-tonne "fatberg" from a Thames sewer after a blockage was causing serious flow issues to the entire city.