National

'Not the right time': SA firm on border backflip

'Not the right time': SA firm on border backflip
South Australia Premier Steven Marshall has stood firm on his decision to keep the state's borders closed to Victoria.
Mr Marshall yesterday announced his state would not be opening its borders to Victoria in light of the recent surge in coronavirus cases.
He told Today he is committed to ensuring all borders reopen, however the safety was still the top priority.
SA Premier Steven Marshall defends decision to close borders to Victoria. July 1, 2020. (9News)
"We are concerned about what is happening in Victoria," he said.
"What we are doing is making sure that we keep the people of South Australia safe and protected.
"The SA government has sent a group of paramedics and nurses to Victoria to assist with the state's esclalting number of cases.
"If Victoria does well, Australia does well, that's great for South Australia. We are playing our part."
Prime Minister Scott Morrison has continued to encourage states to reopen domestic borders in order to keep the economy up and running ,however Mr Marshall said South Australia would only open borders to states with low transmission rates.
READ MORE: Victoria's tough lockdowns to take affect within hours
Victoria has recorded 64 new cases of coronavirus as of June 30, 2020. (Nine)
"We moved quickly, we are open to Queensland, Northern Territory Western Australia and Tasmania," Mr Marshall said.
"Our transition committee is meeting again this week. We are looking very closely at the ACT and NSW.
"We are all committed to going back to having no borders in Australia, as soon as it's safe to do so," he said.
South Australia has continued to ease restrictions with the one person per four-square-metre rule now relaxed to allow one person per two-square-metres, doubling the capacity of businesses. There is now no maximum number of patrons a venue can allow inside.
Mass testing is being conducted in Victoria to curb the spread of the COVID-19 throughout the state. (Getty)
Indoor contact sport competitions are now allowed to resume and venues previously considered high-risk for the spread of coronavirus such as food courts and nightclubs are now allowed to reopen.
Casinos and gaming rooms are now allowed to begin trading and businesses' spas and saunas can resume operating.
Mr Marshall said the state's tourism industry was already seeing the benefits of easing restrictions and thanked South Australians for their vigilance in stopping the spread of the virus.
"This is really creating jobs in South Australia as we are back on that pathway to economic recovery here, but also around the rest of the country," he said.
Of the state's 443 total cases, 436 have now recovered and no patients remain in ICU.